Named You Saviour.

Chiang Mai’s most prominent urban feature is the perfectly square moat surrounding the area referred to as the “Old City”.

The Old City, for those who have never had the pleasure of visiting the home of nomadic spiritual cryptocurrency enthusiasts, is the “touristy” part of Chiang Mai. Great food. Lovely architecture. Drunk westerners. And what is easily my favourite jazz club on the planet.

Okay back to the moat. Let’s discuss it briefly and diplomatically. Its biological composition is “diverse” and its influence on traffic is “significant”.

Despite these issues, my relationship with the thing wasn’t compromised and walking along it was one of my favourite pastimes during the 9 months I spent in Northern Thailand.

The photo

“Named You Saviour” was taken early-morning on Sunday 18 August.

1/4000 sec at f1.4, ISO 100
Nikon D750 | 50mm

I had ventured out at dawn to take advantage of some unexpected sunlight. During my somewhat frustrating expedition, the sun disappeared behind the clouds and I became depressed (although it’s possible that my mood was influenced by factors unrelated to the weather).

Heading home along the northern edge of the moat, I noticed the reflection of the golden spire in a puddle of what may or may not have been rainwater. (If this photo was taken in Saigon, the term “Street Sauce” may have been more appropriate).

I felt that the scene itself was a little sparse and waited for some early morning traffic to enter the frame. I sat myself down and snapped about two-dozen shots of humans on various forms of transport passing through.

Eventually I was fortunate enough for these two travellers to come by. Honestly I couldn’t have asked for better subjects. Their posture, the vintage-style suitcase, their position in relation to the puddle – perfect.

I’m extremely grateful to have grabbed good focus on them, given the aperture size, but I got lucky. What also worked out really well was the fact that the clouds had built up quite a bit while I was waiting, lending some essential texture to a large area of the photograph; a washed-out sky would have ruined the shot.

This was also somewhat of a landmark photo for me. It was here that I first started messing around with Lightroom’s Camera Calibration settings thanks to a random CreativeLive preset I had stumbled across.

This was the photograph where I first started developing the colour pallette that’s become somewhat of a signature style for me.

It’s a photo I’m super happy to have taken and I’m not too proud to say that the response from my fans on Instagram pleased me greatly.

If you want to own this or one of several other of my photographs, head over to my online store. Or click here to find out more about the purchasing process.

The prints are inexpensive proportionate to their generous size, while mounted canvas prints cost slightly more but are delivered ready to hang and look terrific.

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